Eleven Cities Intend To Bid for the FIFA WYC 2007

Ottawa, Ontario – The Canadian Soccer Association (CSA) has received 11 letters of intent, from 11 cities across Canada, to bid to host a venue for the FIFA World Youth Championship 2007. Including Edmonton and Toronto, which have already been pre-determined as the two major venues, a total of 13 cities are interested in hosting the Championships. A total of six cities will co-host the FIFA World Youth Championship, including Edmonton and Toronto, as well as four additional cities to be selected on May 4, 2005. Letters of intent have been received from Calgary, Hamilton, Laval, London, Montreal, Ottawa, Quebec City, Sherbrooke, Vancouver, Victoria, and Winnipeg. “I am absolutely delighted with the response we have had to date from cities all across Canada to our call for letters of intent to host the FIFA World Youth Championships in 2007,” stated Andy Sharpe, President of The Canadian Soccer Association and Chair of the National Organizing Committee.

Ottawa, Ontario – The Canadian Soccer Association (CSA) has received 11 letters of intent, from 11 cities across Canada, to bid to host a venue for the FIFA World Youth Championship 2007. Including Edmonton and Toronto, which have already been pre-determined as the two major venues, a total of 13 cities are interested in hosting the Championships.

A total of six cities will co-host the FIFA World Youth Championship, including Edmonton and Toronto, as well as four additional cities to be selected on May 4, 2005.

Letters of intent have been received from Calgary, Hamilton, Laval, London, Montreal, Ottawa, Quebec City, Sherbrooke, Vancouver, Victoria, and Winnipeg.

“I am absolutely delighted with the response we have had to date from cities all across Canada to our call for letters of intent to host the FIFA World Youth Championships in 2007,” stated Andy Sharpe, President of The Canadian Soccer Association and Chair of the National Organizing Committee. “To have this type of response from all across the country has exceeded our most optimistic projections. We are most encouraged by not only the quality of organizations we are dealing with but also their intent to stage the best ever FIFA World Youth Championship in FIFA history in Canada in 2007 as well as creating a series of legacies for the sport of soccer to enjoy following the conclusion of this Championship.”

To host the Championship, all sites must present a stadium which has a minimum 10,000 seating capacity combined with an optimal natural grass playing surface or a FIFA Recommended artificial grass playing surface. All sites now will have until April 20, 2005 to submit their actual detailed bid proposal which will include all details regarding stadium, training facilities, hotels, organizing committees as well as all financial provisions.

The next step for the bid applicants is to submit their official bid by April 20, 2005. The National Organizing Committee, consisting of the CSA’s Executive Committee as well as IMG Vice President Kevin Albrecht will then meet on May 2-3 to receive presentations from all bidding cities. CSA will announce the winning four cities on May 4, 2005.

Canada was awarded the FIFA World Youth Championship 2007 in August of 2004.

FIFA World Youth Championship

The FIFA World Youth Championship is a three-week, 24 nation, 52-match tournament featuring the best youth (Under-20) players in the world. It is the second largest event staged by FIFA, following the FIFA World CupTM. Graduates include: Bebeto, Thierry Henry, Luis Figo, Diego Maradona, Michael Owen, Ronaldinho, and Javier Saviola, as well as Canada’s Craig Forrest and members of the current Men’s World Cup Team, including Julian de Guzman, Iain Hume, Atiba Hutchinson, and Paul Stalteri.

Last held in the CONCACAF (The Confederation of North, Central America and Caribbean Association Football) region of Mexico in 1983, Canada’s most recent participation in this event occurred last December when its squad had its best ever finish, losing to eventual silver medalist Spain, on a golden goal in the quarter finals held in the United Arab Emirates.

The Championship will take place in six major stadiums across Canada, with the dates for the tournament set for July 1-22, 2007.
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Calgary: The City of Calgary is interested in hosting a site for the World Youth Championships and is in the process of determining which stadium will be refurbished in order to meet FIFA’s stadium requirements. Calgary has hosted several major sporting events including the 1988 Winter Olympics.

Edmonton: Edmonton’s Commonwealth Stadium is Canada’s largest soccer-friendly stadium with a capacity of 60,000 spectators. In 2002, Edmonton and the Commonwealth Stadium hosted the inaugural FIFA Under-19 Women’s World Championship. The city drew record crowds as Canada played the United States in front of 48,000 spectators, in the final on September 1, 2002.

Hamilton: Hamilton has hosted several sporting events over the years including the 2003 (and 2006) Bell Canadian Open, the 1986 World Junior Hockey Championships, and international soccer tournaments such as the 1993 World University Games (women’s soccer). Hamilton has the support of Tourism Hamilton and McMaster University.

Laval: The Corporation Complexe Multi-Sport de Laval Inc. and Tourism de Laval wish to be selected as a site for the FIFA World Youth Championship 2007. Laval will have to build a new stadium in order to meet FIFA’s requirements for this event.

London: London has submitted a letter of intent with support from the City of London to be handled by the 32 Panel Sports Corporation and the London Gryphons of the W-League. 32 Panel Sports Corporation, the owners of London Gryphons Soccer team, are in the process of constructing a soccer-specific stadium in London to be ready for use in late 2006.

Montreal: The organizers hope to build on the success of the Montreal Impact of the USL First Division by taking the opportunity to exhibit excellence in hosting such a major event in order to stimulate further interest in professional and high-level competition soccer.

Ottawa: Ottawa’s Frank Clair Stadium, with its artificial FIFA recommended surface (FieldTurf), has a capacity of 28,000 spectators. The letter of intent is supported by the City of Ottawa, Ottawa Tourism, The Eastern Ontario Soccer Association, The Ottawa Fury Soccer Club of the W-League, and the CFL’s Ottawa Renegades Football Club. Ottawa has hosted numerous women’s soccer events including friendlies against Brazil and England in 2003 averaging 18,000 spectators.

Quebec City: Quebec City, in conjunction with the Université Laval and the Association Règionale de Soccer de Québec, submitted a letter of intent. The city plans to host games at the PEPS Stadium located at the Université Laval. The stadium is equipped with an artificial surface, currently holds 10,000 spectators and can be expanded to 14,000 with temporary seating, and has successfully staged Montreal Impact games in the past.

Sherbrooke: The City of Sherbrooke and the Université de Sherbrooke have submitted a letter of intent. In 2004, the University hosted a Montreal Impact game with an attendance of 10,000 spectators and was also host to the World Junior Athletics Championship in 2002. The natural grass stadium located at the Université de Sherbrooke can hold 12,000 spectators.

Toronto: A major factor in FIFA awarding this event to CSA and Canada was the recent decision by the Governments of Canada, and Ontario on May 21, 2004, to financially support the development of the new Toronto stadium with a joint $35 million contribution to this project. The only condition cited in the awarding of this grant was the requirement by FIFA to stage the FIFA World Youth Championship in Canada in 2007. The 25,000 seat stadium on the York University campus will be built, and will serve as a world-class venue for Canadian soccer for decades to come. Toronto will be the main site headquarters for the Championship and will host the most number of matches (minimum of eleven, including the official Championship opening ceremonies and opening game featuring the Canadian National Youth team).

Vancouver/Burnaby: Vancouver has been a popular city for hosting international events including the FIFA Under-19 Women’s World Championship 2002 and most recently, two 2006 FIFA Men’s World Cup qualifying matches in 2004. Vancouver is the home of the Whitecaps FC of the USL First Division and W-League. Stadium options include Swangard Stadium which has a capacity of 7,000 which would have to be upgraded to hold a minimum of 10,000 fans, or any other stadium project still to be developed.

Victoria: Victoria has hosted several CONCACAF tournaments in conjunction with the CSA, and in 2002, were one of the three cities to host the very successful FIFA Under-19 Women’s World Championship 2002 . Centennial Stadium, at the University of Victoria, would be the stadium holding close to 6,000 spectators. Stadium seats would have to be added as a result of FIFA’s requirement for a minimum capacity of 10,000.

Winnipeg: Winnipeg hosted the 1999 Pan American Games with great success. Winnipeg is looking to build a new stadium. A $10 million indoor/outdoor soccer facility is being proposed by the Winnipeg Soccer Federation. It would be a combination indoor fourplex with all the amenities, as well as an outdoor 10,000 seat stadium with a third generation artificial turf field. Details of the proposal are being worked out between the City of Winnipeg and the Winnipeg Soccer Federation.

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