Canada Soccer

Around the Soccer World | Archives

Sort Results: Newest First Best Match

Connaught Series: the captains who lifted Canada's national laurels

Posted on 2 October 2017 in Around the Soccer World

Connaught Series 1913 to 1939 More

Thorlakson retired from soccer career that included FIFA Women's World Cup

Posted on 30 September 2017 in Around the Soccer World

Thorlakson scored winning goal of 2011 Jubilee Trophy finals More

Connaught Series: 18 scoring stars that notched the Championship winner

Posted on 24 September 2017 in Around the Soccer World

18 players scored Championship winners from 1913 to 1939 More

Connaught Series: Verdun Park win 1934 Championship

Posted on 10 September 2017 in Around the Soccer World

Verdun Park win national honours More

Connaught Series: Nanaimo City win national titles in 1923 and 1927

Posted on 3 September 2017 in Around the Soccer World

Nanaimo City wins Connaught Series in 1923 and 1927 More

Connaught Series: Toronto Scottish FC win three Canadian titles

Posted on 27 August 2017 in Around the Soccer World

Toronto Scottish FC win titles in 1921, 1932, and 1933 More

Connaught Series: Montréal Canadian Nationals were best in the east

Posted on 18 August 2017 in Around the Soccer World

Montréal Canadian National Railways win 1929 Championship More

Ontario wins gold at Canada Games Men's Soccer Tournament

Posted on 13 August 2017 in Around the Soccer World

Ontario 1:0 Alberta More

Connaught Series: Hamilton Westinghouse were first champions from Ontario

Posted on 13 August 2017 in Around the Soccer World

Hamilton Westinghouse win 1920 Connaught Cup More

Connaught Series: young Radials upset Carsteel to claim national honours

Posted on 6 August 2017 in Around the Soccer World

Vancouver Radials win 1939 Challenge Trophy More

Canada Games Women's Soccer Tournament All-Stars

Posted on 6 August 2017 in Around the Soccer World

18 all-stars selected by coaches More

Canada Games continues with Men's Soccer Tournament

Posted on 5 August 2017 in Around the Soccer World

Canada Games Men's Soccer Tournament: 7 to 12 August More

Québec wins gold at Canada Games Women's Soccer Tournament

Posted on 4 August 2017 in Around the Soccer World

Québec 1:0 Ontario More

Connaught Series: North Shore XI win national laurels in 1938

Posted on 30 July 2017 in Around the Soccer World

North Shore United FC More

Promising young talent showcased at Canada Games

Posted on 28 July 2017 in Around the Soccer World

Canada Games Women's Soccer Tournament: 29 July to 3 August More

Connaught Series: Vancouver Johnston National Storage win national title

Posted on 23 July 2017 in Around the Soccer World

Vancouver Johnston National Storage More

Connaught Series: Calgary Hillhurst FC were first champions from Alberta

Posted on 16 July 2017 in Around the Soccer World

Calgary Hillhurst FC win 1922 championship More

Connaught Series: Winnipeg Scottish FC wins 1915 championship

Posted on 10 July 2017 in Around the Soccer World

Winnipeg Scottish FC win 1915 championship More

Connaught Series: dominant Westminster side wins four national titles in nine years

Posted on 2 July 2017 in Around the Soccer World

Dominant team of the era More

Connaught Series: Ulstermen returned honours to Toronto

Posted on 25 June 2017 in Around the Soccer World

Toronto Ulster United win 1925 Championship More

Grab the RSS feed for this category

Five days after capturing the 1922 Dominion of Canada Football Championship, Calgary Hillhurst FC were welcomed home to a Thursday parade, a Friday luncheon, and a Saturday smoker. Coming off the train, the captain Stan Wakelyn presented the Connaught Cup to his father William before being shouldered off by teammates to the awaiting cars.

Stan Wakelyn, remembered years later as "probably the greatest centre forward this city has seen," was the hero of Calgary, bringing home the Connaught Cup just a year after Alberta Soccer entered the national competition. As winning captain, Wakelyn received the Connaught Cup in Toronto after his team defeated Toronto Ulster United FC in the championship series. Upon returning home, he served as the team spokeperson, explaining at a reception that "to know that the people of Calgary are proud of the fact that we performed the championship feat successfully is quite as pleasant to us as to actually be identified in the games that brought us title results."

Wakelyn was one of the great Alberta soccer players from the first half century, also recognised as a finalist in The Canadian Press polling for soccer's Best in 50 Years. On the pitch, Wakelyn's greatest feat was delivering what turned out to be Alberta Soccer's only Dominion title in more than 50 years before Calgary Springer Kickers finally returned the national laurels to the province in 1974.


THE CAPTAINS
From 1913 to 1939, there were 21 different captains or vice-captains that lifted the Dominion of Canada Football Championship trophy, be it the Connaught Cup until 1925 or the sterling new Challenge Trophy starting in 1926. Dave Turner of Westminster Royals FC was the only player to accept the trophy on multiple occasions.

In most years, it was the Canada Soccer President or Past President that handed the trophy to the winning team. Newly-elected president Tom Watson was the first presenter at Fort William on 6 September 1913, handing the trophy to Alex Simpson, captain of the Norwood Wanderers of St. Boniface, Manitoba.

John Easton, Canada Soccer's president from 1922 to 1925, made the most presentations up until 1939. As Past President, he was often the highest ranking local officer when the Championship final was played in Winnipeg. Over the years, he made presentations to captains James McDougall (Nanaimo FC 1923), Art King (Winnipeg United Weston FC 1924), Neil McFarlane (Nanaimo FC 1927), Davie Weir (Toronto Scottish FC 1933), Humphrey Payne (Verdun Park FC 1934), Jim Lawrie (Vancouver Johnston National Storage 1937), and Tommy McKibbin (Vancouver Radials 1939).

In 1925, Easton presented the Connaught Cup to Tommy Johnson, who was filling in for ejected captain Bobby Lavery of Toronto Ulster United FC. Incidentally, that was the last year that the Connaught Cup was presented to the winning team of the Championship. In 1926, Canada Soccer council member H.W. Scrymgeour presented the new Challenge Trophy to Winnipeg captain Dan King. 

Lavery wasn't the only captain who missed the Cup presentation over the years. In 1915, Billy Corrie filled in for injured Billy Anderson when Winnipeg Scottish FC won the Connaught Cup. Anderson missed the final through an ankle injury, but he still traveled with the team to Toronto and wrote about the game for the Winnipeg Tribune.

Billy Somers likely would have lifted the Challenge Trophy in 1933 had he not missed the final series through injury. Weir took his place as team captain. One year earlier, Somers had lifted the 1932 title for Toronto Scottish FC in Toronto. Canada Soccer's past president Tom Holland presented the trophy to Somers.

Somers was one of eight captains that got to lift the national trophy in their home or a neighbouring city. Harry McMaster was the first in 1914, lifting the Connaught Cup for St. Boniface in neighbouring Winnipeg. After that, Jimmy McLaggan won the 1919 title in Montréal (Grand Trunk FC), Tiny Thombs won the 1920 title in Toronto (for Hamilton Westinghouse), Harry Acourt won the 1921 title in Toronto (Scottish FC), the King brothers won the 1924 and 1926 titles in Winnipeg (United Weston FC), Somers won the 1932 title in Toronto, and Turner won the 1936 title in Vancouver (for Westminster Royals). 

In 1929, the Challenge Trophy was actually presented by an agent of club sponsor Canadian National Railways to Montréal CNR head coach Humphrey Payne. The coach Payne then presented the trophy to captain Peter Keir. Years later, Keir was player-manager when Montréal Aldred Building won the 1935 title, but that year Winnipeg Mayor John Queen presented the Challenge Trophy to captain Bob Campbell.

In 1938, Canada Soccer general secretary Sam Davidson presented the Challenge Trophy to North Shore United FC captain Bob Harrison. Like Keir before him, Harrison won another Championship years later as manager of a winning team, North Shore United FC in 1949. Again like Keir, Harrison let his captain Tommy Cummings accept the Challenge Trophy, presented by then president Otis Todd.


In celebration of our nation's 150th anniversary, the Canada Soccer Hall of Fame pays tribute to the early years of our Championship: the Connaught Series from 1913 to 1939. Every Sunday from May through September, Canada Soccer remembers the players, legends, teams, and champions from a golden era of football in the Dominion.

‎In Canada's 150th year, Canada Soccer will crown their 150th national champions across all adult and professional competitions since 1913. The 2017 competitive season will crown the Futsal Canadian Championship winners in April, the professional Canadian Championship winners in June, and the amateur National Championships women's Jubilee Trophy and men's Challenge Trophy winners in October.

 

 

 

When Canada Soccer's Toyota National Championships kick off in Surrey on 4 October, a familiar face from the Surrey United SC squad won't be there. Katie Thorlakson, a former FIFA Women's World Cup player, has retired from active play to concentrate on her career as a firefighter.

Thorlakson made 23 international appearances for Canada Soccer's Women's National Team from 2004 to 2007. At 22 years old, she won a bronze medal at the Pan American Games in Rio and then made the final squad for the FIFA Women's World Cup China 2007. In the second match at China 2007 - a 4:0 win over Ghana - Thorlakson started up front with Christine Sinclair and Kara Lang, the first time that trio had been reunited since the FIFA U-19 Women's World Championship Canada 2002.

"2002 was a pivotal time for women's soccer in Canada," said Thorlakson, who helped Canada win silver at the inaugural edition of what is now the FIFA U-20 Women's World Cup. "We played so well and we finished second which was huge."

So too were the crowds. The championship final on 1 September at Commonwealth Stadium in Edmonton drew an astonishing 47,784 fans, still a single-match record for the FIFA U-20 Women's World Cup. Canada ultimately fell 0:1 to USA in extra time, but Canada won the hearts of a nation in picking up the silver medal. From that team, 10 players went on the feature in one or more FIFA Women's World Cups at the international "A" level. 

In 2004, Thorlakson won a trio of titles at the youth international, club, and college level: the CONCACAF Women's Under-19 Championship with Canada, the USL W-League Championship with Vancouver Whitecaps FC, and the NCAA title with the University of Notre Dame.

Beyond her international career, Thorlakson was a key cog in the Surrey United SC team, winning the Jubilee Trophy as national champions in 2011. She scored the 2-0 goal of the championship game, the eventual game winner in a 2:1 gold-medal victory over Royal-Sélect Beauport. In all, Thorlakson played in five National Championships between 2009 and 2014, also winning silver twice and bronze twice.

"Surrey United was such an exciting club," said Thorlakson, who left the club after the 2015-16 season. "They treated me like family and I really appreciated that. Coming from (my hometown) in Langley, it was a great experience (and) there have been a lot of great players that have played for Surrey United."

While she is no longer playing, Thorlakson still follows the game, notably still rooting for Canada Soccer's Women's National Team. In 2015, she attended matches at the FIFA Women's World Cup Canada 2015.

"It is really exciting now to watch the young talent and see the direction (in which) the Canadian team is heading."

Now in Vancouver, Thorlakson will have chances to watch both her club and country compete in the coming months. Surrey United SC are back in the Toyota National Championships for the first time since 2014, with this year's edition scheduled from 4-9 October at Newton Athletic Field in Surrey. Canada Soccer's Women's National Team, meanwhile, are scheduled for a Women's International Friendly match on 9 November at BC Place in downtown Vancouver, a fierce rivalry match against USA.

 

Bobby Lavery was Canada's ace centre forward of the 1920s. After his nine-men Toronto Ulster United FC were shut out by Calgary Hillhurst FC in the 1922 Connaught Series finale, Lavery wasn't about to let another Dominion title slip through his fingers three years later.

Incidentally, Toronto Ulster United FC also finished that 1925 final match reduced to nine men, but only this time their heated ejections came after captain Lavery gave the Ulstermen the decisive 2-0 lead with goals on either side of the break.

Lavery's Championship-winning, two-goal performance in the 1925 Connaught Series was one of the highlights of his Hall of Fame career. Years later, Canada Soccer General Secretary Sam Davidson still called it "the greatest game of football ever played in Canada." Deadlocked with Nanaimo after back-to-back draws in the Dominion final played at Carruthers Park in Winnipeg, Lavery and the Ulster team won their first and only Connaught Cup after, in the words of the Winnipeg Tribune, they "played as if their very lives depended on the outcome."


CHAMPIONSHIP WINNERS
Lavery was one of 18 players credited with scoring the series-winning goal in 24 editions of the Dominion of Canada Football Championship from 1913 to 1939. There was no winning goal in 1914 (when St. Boniface won on goal average) while five players scored two Championship winners in the 1920s and 1930s: Alex Fowler, Jock Coulter, Hector MacDonald, Bob Campbell, Dave Turner.

In 1913, the Norwood Wanderers of St. Boniface won their first of back-to-back Dominion titles on points, with Simmonds scoring a brace to secure the decisive point and the Connaught Cup. While the 1913 round-robin series didn't have a final, Simmonds was the first of nine players to score two or more goals in the decisive game.

Charles Forsyth of Winnipeg Scottish FC scored two goals in the decisive match of the 1915 final (a 6:1 win over Toronto Lancashire) while Billy Gilvear of Hamilton Westinghouse scored a brace in the 1920 final (both the equaliser and extra-time winner of a 2:1 victory over Winnipeg Brittania). Alex Slidders of Winnipeg United Weston FC then scored two goals including the winner in the penultimate match of the 1924 final (Winnipeg won the two-match series 3-2 over Montréal Canadian Explosives, with all five goals scored in the first match).

After Lavery scored his brace in 1925, Alex Fowler of Nanaimo FC scored a brace in the opening match of the 1927 final, a 9:0 demolition of Fort William Canadian Legion. Nanaimo won the two-match, total goals series 14-1 (Fowler scored again in the second match). Four years earlier, Fowler had scored the Championship winner in a much closer final between Nanaimo and Montréal CPR: after Nanaimo scored in the first match and Montréal equalised in the second match, Fowler scored the third goal of the series in a 1:0 win to capture the Connaught Cup. 

In 1928, the Connaught Series switched from a total goals format to a best of three format in the Championship final. That year, Jock Coulter scored a record four goals in the 1928 final for Westminster Royals FC, a 6:1 win over Montréal CNR. Coulter again scored the Championship winner two years later in 1930, this time the lone goal from the penalty mark in a 1:0 win over the same Montréal CNR.

James "Swede" Larsen and Mike McManus were the next two-goal scorers in the Connaught Series final. In 1937, Larsen scored the equaliser and winner in Vancouver Johnston National Storage's come-from-behind 3:2 victory over Toronto Ulster United FC. One year later, both Larsen and Mike McManus scored two goals each in North Shore United's 6:2 victory over Timmins Dome Mines. The McManus 3-0 goal stood as the 1938 winner.

From 1919 to 1926, Jimmy McLeish, Hector MacDonald, Sammy Gough, and Johnny Lang scored the other Cup winners when the series featured the total goals format. McLeish helped Montréal Grand Trunk FC win the 1919 series 3-1; MacDonald helped Toronto Scottish FC win the 1921 series 4-0; Gough helped Calgary Hillhurst FC win the 1922 series 2-1; and Lang helped Winnipeg United Weston FC win the 1926 series 3-2 (after three draws, Lang scored an 89th-minute winner in the fourth and final match).

Amazingly, MacDonald scored Championship winners 12 years apart. A three-time winner with Scottish FC (1921, 1932, 1933), he scored his second Championship winner when he scored the opening goal of the 1933 finale (a 3:0 win over Prince Albert City Reds).

Bob Campbell scored Championship winners in 1929 (with Montréal CNR) and 1935 (with Montréal Aldred) while Dave Turner scored Championship winners in 1931 and 1936 (both with Westminster Royals FC). Also in the 1930s, Jimmy Winning scored the winner in 1932 (Toronto Scottish FC), Roland Castonguay scored the winner in 1934 (Verdun Park FC), and Reg Liptrot scored the winner in 1939 (Vancouver Radials FC).


In celebration of our nation's 150th anniversary, the Canada Soccer Hall of Fame pays tribute to the early years of our Championship: the Connaught Series from 1913 to 1939. Every Sunday from May through September, Canada Soccer remembers the players, legends, teams, and champions from a golden era of football in the Dominion.

‎In Canada's 150th year, Canada Soccer will crown their 150th national champions across all adult and professional competitions since 1913. The 2017 competitive season will crown the Futsal Canadian Championship winners in April, the professional Canadian Championship winners in June, and the amateur National Championships women's Jubilee Trophy and men's Challenge Trophy winners in October.

 

 

 

Proud partners of Canada Soccer